Knitted blankets (Charity Knitting)

Sunday, 16 April 2017

Mask and balaclavas

I was asked to make a balaclava for a friend who rides an invalid trolley and found the cold wind too much for her face. I was able to find a suitable pattern called Trav's Balaclava, a free download on ravelry. The balaclava is worked in the round. 

A pale grey acrylic yarn was chosen, Stylecraft Special DK, shade 1099 Grey. 





By pulling the balaclava over the head, with the head passing through the gap for the eyes, it can be
 transformed into a neckwarmer/cowl. 
 
Another friend asked if I could make her a mask to protect her face for when she was riding her bike. The instructions for the balaclava were followed up until the start of the eye opening when all the stitches were cast off. The yarn was supplied by my friend. Knitting essentials DK, shade 991-30, Black Sparkle. 



The same friend then requested a black balaclava made in the same yarn as the mask and following the same pattern as for the grey one. 





Both friends said that they were pleased with their winter warmers. 

Easter chick cosies for chocolate creme eggs 2017

Two of my knitting pals decided to organise an Easter Bazaar on 1st April 2017 to raise funds for Alzheimer's Research UK while BRoW4 (Bike Run or Walk 4), a group I support which raises money for charities that do not receive government or lottery funding, would be running fundraising stalls in the run up to and over the Easter weekend.

My hand knitted contributions were one dozen (12)  chick cosies for chocolate creme eggs for each project. The hand knitted nest was not part of the deal.

Two dozen had knitted cosies for chocolate creme eggs.

The pattern was © Chloe Blunn Designs 2012, a free download from ravelry.

The knitted shape.

Embroider the eyes.

Add the beak.

For the beak I deviated from the pattern by adding a knitted beak instead of a felt beak.

Make two pieces.
Leaving a 10cm (4 inches) tail, using a contrast coloured yarn cast on three stitches.
Cast off these three stitches. There are no rows worked in between the cast on and the cast off.
Cut yarn leaving a 10cm (4 inches) tail.
I found the beak worked best with the cast off edge uppermost for both pieces of the beak.

Gather the stitches at the top of the head.

Join the seam, leaving the cast on edges open.

Ready for the creme egg.

Egg inserted into the cosy.

Two dozen (24) cosies.

One dozen cosies for the Easter Bazaar to raise funds for Alzheimer's Research UK.


One dozen cosies for BRoW4 (Bike Run or Walk 4)


Left cosy without an egg, right cosy with an egg.

This cosy with creme egg especially for my husband. 

Monday, 13 March 2017

Stitch Pattern Library - Double Moss Stitch


Double moss stitch is a simple knit and purl pattern which is entirely reversible, being the same on both sides. The knitted fabric lays flat so is ideal for scarves.

The sample shown was worked using King Cole Ant-Tickle Merino DK on 4mm needles.

Using an even number of stitches
Cast on a multiple of 2 stitches.
1st row *K1, p1. Repeat from * to end of row.
2nd row *K1, p1. Repeat from * to end of row.
3rd row *P1, k1. Repeat from * to end of row.
4th row *P1, k1. Repeat from * to end of row.

These 4 rows form the pattern.
Repeat these 4 rows.


Using an odd number of stitches
Cast on a multiple of 2 stitches, plus one extra stitch.
1st row *K1, p1. Repeat from * to the last stitch, k1.
2nd row  P1, *k1, p1. Repeat from * to end of row.
3rd row *P1, k1. Repeat from * to end last stitch, p1.
4th row K1, * p1, k1. Repeat from * to end of row.

These 4 rows form the pattern.
Repeat these 4 rows.


Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Knits for Shoeboxes 2014

As in previous years, during 2014 I have knitted for Shoeboxes, the finished items given to a knitting colleague who passes them on to the local Methodist Church for processing. In 2014 I focused on scarves, many of them made using yarn gifted to me for the purpose.

Two similar scarves made using a gifted eyelash yarn named Touchy-Feely knitting yarn by Royle. Garter stitch over 21 stitches on 6.5mm needles until two 50g balls for each scarf ran out. June 2014.



Scarf made using a gifted eyelash yarn similar to Sirdar Snowflake DK if not this actual yarn. No ball band with the yarn. Garter stitch over 25 stitches on 5mm needles until ball ran out. June 2014.

Three more hand knitted scarves using gifted yarn thought to be Sirdar Snowflake DK or similar. No ball bands with the yarn. 25 stitches on 5mm needles worked in garter stitch until the ball ran out. A second pink scarf, a pale green and a red. 23rd July 2014.

Hand knitted scarf using gifted Wendy Capri. Worked in garter stitch over 25 stitches on 4.5mm needles until the ball ran out. 23rd July 2014.
Yellow hand knitted scarf using gifted yarn thought to be Sirdar Snowflake DK or similar. No ball bands with the yarn. This yarn was thinner than the other similar yarns. 30 stitches on 4mm needles worked in garter stitch until the ball ran out. 3rd August 2014.
Another hand knitted scarf using gifted yarn thought to be Sirdar Snowflake DK or similar. No ball bands with the yarn. 25 stitches on 5mm needles worked in garter stitch until the ball ran out. 14th August 2014.
Final hand knitted scarf using gifted yarn thought to be Sirdar Snowflake DK or similar. No ball bands with the yarn. 25 stitches on 5mm needles worked in garter stitch until the balls ran out. The colour change was worked using one strand of light blue and one strand of dark blue for two rows so no need for the wearer to decide which is the Right Side or the Wrong Side. 14th August 2014.


Shaggy side of a colourful hand knitted shaggy scarf using stash acrylic double knitting yarns. 30 stitches on 4 mm needles in garter stitch. 14.5cm/5½ inches wide, 82sm/32 inches long. 3rd August 2014. Pattern: http://paulineknitscarfpatterns.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/reversible-colourful-shaggy-garter.html


Reverse (Plain) side of a colourful hand knitted shaggy scarf using stash acrylic double knitting yarns. 30 stitches on 4 mm needles in garter stitch. 14.5cm/5½ inches wide, 82sm/32 inches long. 3rd August 2014. Pattern: http://paulineknitscarfpatterns.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/reversible-colourful-shaggy-garter.html
Second hand knitted scarf for Shoeboxes using gifted Wendy Capri. Worked in garter stitch over 25 stitches on 4.5mm needles until the ball ran out. 14th August 2014.
Scarf for Shoeboxes using gifted 'net' scarf yarn. No ball band with the yarn but later found to be Yarnfair Designer Scarf Yarn 100g. 8 stitches on 4.5mm needles worked in garter stitch until the ball ran out. 21st August 2014.
Second large hand knitted scarf for Shoeboxes using gifted Patons Mona Lisa. 30 stitches on 4.5mm needles. 17cm wide, 100cm long. 26th August 2014.
Scarf for Shoeboxes using gifted pompom yarn. 8 stitches on 4.5mm needles until the ball ran out. The normal chain cast off left a puckered edge. Instead, securing the yarn with a slip stitch on the first live knitted stitch, a length of crochet chain was worked across the width of the scarf while at the same time securing the live knitted stitches. September 2014.
Final large had knitted scarf for Shoeboxes using gifted Patons Mona Lisa. September 2014.


Two pointed ended scarves for young children using gifted Patons Mona Lisa. 25 stitches on 4.5mm needles, 81cm/32cm long. 23rd September 2014. 

Sideways knitted scarf for a young child using gifted Patons Mona Lisa. 23rd September 2014. 

The people assembling Shoeboxes are ingenious, coming up with all sorts of ideas to upcycle. As well as hand knits, I have also collected and given:
  • Screw tops from milk cartons to be used as counters for games.
  • Cellophane and similar greetings cards wrappers to be used to hold sheets of paper among other items.
  • Greetings cards fronts and magazines with plenty of pictures.
  • Empty denture cleansing tablet tubes.
  • Cardboard and plastic inners from cones of yarn.
  • Inner tubes from rolls of paper towels. 
  • Spectacles cases which can be used to hold sewing kits among other items.
  • Sturdy small cardboard boxes.

Other knitting colleagues have also collected the same plus:
  • Knitted scarves, hats and gloves.
  • Knitted purses.
  • Small yoghurt drink bottles with lids to be used as skittles.
  • Cat shaped plastic cat food containers to be painted and used as boxes. 




                                        

Saturday, 27 August 2016

Blue and white knitted flower hair ties

After making some knitted flower hair ties to be sold to raise funds for good causes, I was asked to make fifteen in mid-blue and white for a special young lady.

Knitting Essentials Blue double knitting 100% acrylic, and Knitting Essentials white Sparkle double knitting 98% acrylic 2% metallic yarn.




The pattern will soon be available.

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Hand knitted dishcloths for Huntingdonshire Society for the Blind

In February 2016, someone I know who works for Huntingdonshire Society for the Blind asked me if I would knit some dishcloths for the Society to sell in its charity shop. The knitting cotton and pattern were provided. Thick needles and garter stitch made for an easy knitting experience: pick-up-and-put-down projects while dinner was cooking, at knit and natter sessions, and when not feeling up to knitting anything complicated.

I started knitting for the Society in February 2016 and made my first delivery on 2nd March. In exchange for a delivery was more knitting cotton (at my request). Deliveries of finished cloths and simultaneous collections of at first two and later three balls of yarn became a regular event until near the end of July 2016 when the Society said it had enough dishcloths from its team of knitters for the time being. I have asked to be notified when more cloths are required.

Two balls of knitting cotton made five cloths with yarn left over, and three balls made eight cloths with yarn left over. Yarn left over from a previous ball was used to start the next cloth so that none was wasted.

The photographs (in no particular order) show a total of 71 dishcloths made, plus at least another batch of five for which there are no pictures.

The first five. Two balls. 0+5 =5 cloths

Eight. Three balls. 5 + 8 = 13 cloths.

Nine. Three balls. 13 + 9 = 22 cloths.

Eight. Three balls. 22 + 8 = 30 cloths.

Eight. Three balls. 30 + 8 = 38 cloths. 

Eight. Three balls. 38+ 8 = 46 cloths.

Eight. Three balls. 46 + 8 = 54. 

Nine. Three balls. 54 + 9 = 63. 

The final eight. Three balls. 63 + 8 = 71.


Ball band.